Archive | homicide

Miami Dade Police Search for Lily Aramburo: Call for Volunteers!

The investigation into the disappearance of Lily Aramburo who was reported missing on June 2, 2007 has been active since Miami Dade Police Homicide took over the case. (Hallelujah!) On Friday, April 22nd, 2011 Miami Dade Police searched an area close to where Lily disappeared, by the Dadeland Village Apartments. Unfortunately, at that time the police department didn’t approve of us bringing volunteers to assist in the search. The small group of Homicide detectives, crime scene personnel and search dogs tried their best but the area was too large and overgrown.
 Dt. Miller, Sgt. Gallagher, Janet Forte, Dt. Hoadley, Ana Lanuza (I don’t know the other detectives names)
 Janet Forte, Dt. Hoadley, PI Joe Carrillo

More pictures of the search

Miami Dade Police gave us the green light to do our own search. We need at least 20-25 people to help us search the area. It is a lot of space to cover and it is totally overgrown so we’re going to need a lot of help. If you live in the South Florida area, please consider lending a hand. We’ll be conducting the search the week of May 9th. Please contact me for more information at janet.forte(@gmail.com).
We’re also planning a candlelight vigil on that week. It’s going to be an opportunity to come together as a community to show our support for Lily and her family in this time of difficulty. It’s a time to stand together in prayer and solidarity in support of Lily.
Our deepest respects and thanks to all persons and agencies involved in this organized effort to find Lily. We wish to extend our gratitude to Det. Ray Hoadley ~ thank you for your outstanding efforts, diligence and selfless dedication to Lily’s investigation and 30+ years of helping victims and making a difference in our community. We wish you a very happy and peaceful retirement. We’ll miss you! We’d also like to thank Sgt. Gallagher, Det. Miller, and the Miami Dade Police Homicide Specialized Investigations Squad members for their assistance and support in our fight to find Lily. And a special word of thanks to Joe Carrillo and partner Ana and team.

We thank all of those who continue to help spread awareness for Lily online by sharing her pictures, blog posts and updates. Please continue sharing this blog and the Help Find Lily page on Facebook. We hope it helps encourage people to come forward with information. Please help bring Justice for Lily.

Report anonymous tips to Crimestoppers 305-471-TIPS.

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Lily Aramburo Article Featured in Today’s Miami Herald!

I can’t thank David Ovalle and the Miami Herald enough for publishing this article in our hometown newspaper. We’ve been hoping and praying for so long! Thank you so much! 
Read the article below or click on the link. Please share your thoughts by leaving a comment on this blog post! And stay tuned… new post with updates coming soon!

Search continues 4 years later for missing Kendall woman
Direct link to the Miami Herald article:

http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/04/03/2148943/search-continues-4-years-later.html 

By DAVID OVALLE
dovalle@MiamiHerald.com
Homicide detectives have recently re-interviewed her boyfriend, who reported her missing one day after she allegedly left the apartment in her nightgown.
For nearly four years, Lucely “Lily” Aramburo’s vanishing has befuddled family and friends. They insisted the 23-year-old mother who disappeared in June 2007 would never have willingly abandoned her infant son.

They have mounted an Internet campaign to keep the case alive.

It seemed to has paid off. After languishing for more than two years with the Miami-Dade’s missing persons unit, the homicide bureau recently took over the case

The target of the investigation: her boyfriend, Christien Pacheco, who was among the last to see her alive.

In the past two weeks, homicide detectives questioned Pacheco twice, he said in an interview Friday. He even submitted to a polygraph, which he failed – results he disputes.

“It burns me up that they keep coming back up to us,” Pacheco, 36, said of police efforts. “We had nothing to do with her missing. She walked out of my apartment, on her own merit. She left.”

He said he is still wracked by guilt for not showing Aramburo enough affection.

Miami-Dade homicide detectives won’t discuss details of the case, but say Aramburo’s disappearance is suspicious.

“She was always in contact with her friends and her family,’’ said Miami-Dade Detective Ray Hoadley. “She isn’t the type of person who goes out on her own. She doesn’t have the temperament. She doesn’t have the resources. She isn’t the type of person to be living in a cave somewhere. It just doesn’t seem possible she’s alive.”

Raised in Miami, Aramburo was a waif of a woman who had struggled with drug abuse and depression. But relatives say she was getting her life together, and was buoyed by the birth of her son, Palden.

“He knows Lily to be in Heaven,” said Aramburo’s mother, Lucely Zaldivar, 44, who cares for the 4 ½ -year-old boy. “But he doesn’t call her Mommy.”

Pacheco is not the father of her son. The couple’s relationship was stormy and fueled by crack cocaine use.

Longing for stability and fresh out a troubled stay in rehab, she moved in with Pacheco in his one-bedroom Kendall apartment at the Villages of Dadeland.

Police have arrested Pacheco, a former U.S. Marine, on a slew of minor drug and trespassing charges since 2001. He is on two years of state probation for resisting arrest with violence and driving without a valid license.

He says he’s sober now, and keeping out of trouble.

Kelly Rae Starling, Pacheco’s ex-girlfriend and Aramburo’s friend, told The Miami New Times in 2008 that Pacheco once “lunged” at her during an argument, and she had to pull the man off Aramburo.

Pacheco denies that claim, saying the fight was between the two girls.

Starling could not be reached for comment.

The events leading up to Aramburo’s disappearance started the night of June 1, 2007. Pacheco, Starling, Aramburo and another friend known as E.J. smoked crack cocaine together, and later returned to the Kendall apartment, according to records.

Pacheco claims that Starling went to the bedroom, sparking a fight between him and Aramburo because Aramburo didn’t want her sleeping there. He said he went into the bedroom for a few minutes to talk to Starling. When he came out, he said, Aramburo had left.

Pacheco claims he looked for her that night, to no avail. “Maybe she was going outside to chill and relax for a few minutes, and she got into someone’s car and things went bad from there,” Pacheco said.

He reported her missing on June 2, 2007, telling Miami-Dade police that she had left the apartment at 2 a.m., wearing nothing more than a long white nightgown and toting two bungee cords. Aramburo, he told police, suffered from schizophrenia and had a history of suicide attempts, according to a police report.

“Were we a bunch of people messed up on drugs at the time? Yes, but we wouldn’t do anything crazy, like hide somebody’s body,” Pacheco said. “No. We’re not like that.”

There were some puzzling behavior that family members and police looked at. Aramburo’s mother says Pacheco didn’t call her until a full 24 hours later, and only to tell her he filed a police report. Pacheco says that in the drug-fueled haze of those days, he doesn’t remember when he called her.

The case was assigned to detective Aaron Mancha, of the missing persons bureau. In interview several years ago with The Miami Herald, he downplayed Aramburo’s disappearance, saying she had been sighted at the Camillus House homeless shelter in February 2008.

Miami-Dade police now say those sightings have been deemed not credible. One of Pacheco’s friends told investigators that Pacheco asked him to lie about one sighting — something Pacheco denies vehemently.

The case dragged in the initial months after the disappearance, her supporters say.

Aramburo’s friend, new media strategist Janet Forte, began a tenacious Internet campaign, starting a blog and social networking pages dedicated to the case. The sites feature links to news accounts, online videos about Aramburo and photos of vigils dedicated to the missing woman.

“I was really frustrated with the lack of help in getting the story out there in the news,” Forte said. “It was the only avenue I had to get awareness out there.”

Thanks to her efforts drumming up publicity, private investigators Ana Lanuza and Joe Carrillo, of Leverage Investigations Inc., volunteered to begin working on the case in 2008. They’re still working.

The case finally ended up in the hands of detective Hoadley, who secured a conviction last year against a North Carolina man in the 1993 south Miami-Dade disappearance of Trinity Robinson — whose body remains missing.

Detective Hoadley praised Forte’s persistence: “If not for her efforts, who knows if the investigation would have continued?”

Anyone with information can call Miami-Dade’s homicide bureau at 305-471-2400, or Miami-Dade CrimeStoppers at 305-471-TIPS.

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Happy Retirement Detective Hoadley!

I’ve only known Detective Ray Hoadley since December of 2010 when he took over the investigation into the disappearance of my friend Lily Aramburo, but I feel as if I’ve known him for a lifetime. The Miami Dade Police Department has lost a dedicated detective and public servant, for us – we are losing our hero.

Where others failed, Dt. Hoadley succeeded. He did the impossible, he changed my view of the police department and police officers by selfessly doing his job.
He read about Lily’s disappearance in an article written by Francisco Alvarado in the Miami New Times. He took it upon himself to do what needed to be done. He had the case transferred from the Missing Persons Dept to Homicide. He began the investigation from square one. It was hard work but he did it, easy peasy.

Dt. Hoadley began his career in 1980, in the City of Opa Locka and retired in 2011 from the Miami Dade Police Department. Detective Hoadley is a good man, a highly skilled professional and our city will miss him dearly. Thank you, Sir.

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News Update: Lily Aramburo Case Reopened

Lily’s case has been cold for a long time. It’s been a long, agonizing 3 and a half years since the night of June 1, 2007. But finally we have a news update to share. If you’ve been reading this blog for awhile, you may have noticed that I have had my issues with law enforcement, mainly with Detective Mancha’s handling of Lily’s case. Out of desperation, we tried (almost) everything including a week long hunger strike in order to attain police attention and coverage from local media. Nothing worked. In the process, I’ve made my share of mistakes.
The good news is, to our relief, the investigation into Lily’s disappearance has been reopened and reassigned to a new detective. Detective Ray Hoadley from Miami Dade Police Criminal Investigations Division Homicide Bureau is now lead detective. Lily’s family, Private Investigator Joe Carrillo and I have all met with the him. We are working closely together. I’m hopeful as never before. And I have absolute faith in Detective Hoadley. He’s got over 20 years of experience under his belt and has investigated many difficult cases. He’s very effective at what he does. Det. Hoadley is working daily to find the answers which will bring about a resolution to this case.
  Lily Aramburo updated flier:
Miami Dade Police Investigative Case #: 070602291858
NCIC# M497579638
NamUs MP # 1542
Once again we’re reaching out and asking anyone with information to come forward. If you believe someone you know might be involved, please call immediately and share that information. It may be nothing or it may be the missing piece of information that will help bring closure to Lily’s family and little boy. The truth shall set you free.
We know someone knows what happened to Lily and they need to step forward now, not tomorrow or next week or month or year from now – NOW! Make the call to Detective Hoadley at 305-471-2400 or you can email him at rbhoadleyjr@mdpd(.com).
If you wish to remain anonymous please contact Miami Dade County Crimestoppers at 305-471-TIPS (8477) OR 1-866-471-8477. crimestoppersmiami.com You may be eligible to receive a reward.
Lily Aramburo pictures

Assist in the search for Lily by sharing this post with all your friends across the internet. Follow @HelpFindLily  on Twitter and connect with us on Facebook. And please be sure to stay tuned to America’s Most Wanted

Thank you so much for your help and continued support. Many heartfelt thanks for all your prayers for Lily and her family. We are especially grateful to those special individuals who have donated so much of their time and effort into the search for Lily; thank you Joe Carrillo and team. Thank you kindly for your dedication and hard work. And last but not least, sincere thanks to Miami Dade Police Detective Hoadley.

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Thank You Miami New Times!

I’d like to take this opportunity to thank the Miami New Times for including our blog, Justice for Lilly Aramburo on their local blog links. We are very grateful to the Miami New Times Blog for linking to us! Another reason we love the Miami New Times. First, Francisco Alvarado writes the only article ever printed about Lilly, a cover story published last September and now this. It’s a very big deal and I’m extremely humbled.

If you use Twitter, please be sure to follow the Miami New Times.

By the way, let’s keep our fingers crossed for a follow-up article on Lilly Aramburo’s disappearance. Feel free to help make it happen by contacting the Miami New Times directly.

Missing Person: Lilly Aramburo  Missing from: Miami, FL

As always, we appreciate the ongoing support we have received from everyone. Please continue to spread the word about Lilly’s disappearance. And help us bring her home!

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Appeal to Miami Residents For Info in the Possible Homicide of Lilly Aramburo

In 6 months, it will mark the 2nd year anniversary since Lilly Aramburo was last seen by family and friends. The night was June 1, 2007, at approximately 2am. She walked out of her live-in boyfriend’s condo after a heated argument and has never been seen alive since.
Lilly Aramburo Texas Equusearch Flyer
Lilly’s family is asking the public for help. If you know anything at all or have information regarding the disappearance of Lucely “Lilly” Aramburo, Lilly’s mother, family and friends urge you to contact Miami Dade Police at 305-418-7200 or Crime Stoppers at (305)471-8477. (You can get a cash reward of up to $1000!) It offers complete anonymity. Lilly may have walked to the bus stop or to the Metrorail Station which is very near to Dadeland Mall. She may have traveled to the Coconut Grove area.

DO YOU KNOW WHAT HAPPENED TO LILLY?
Justice for Missing mother Lilly Aramburo

MISSING Lilly Aramburo

Chances are you’ve probably never met Lilly but if you did, you would understand why we’re so determined to find her. Lilly was a girl of peace, a young mother who loved her baby boy very much. She was a humble person and good friend who touched everyone she met with her beautiful smile. She had the energy of a small child. It is a shame that this had to happen. And that her disappearance has remained unnoticed, while the media arbitrarily picks and chooses who they find important.

She loved music, and although she loved rock, oldies were secretly her favorite songs. She loved to read and write in her journals, but refused to learn computers. She was a very simple girl, who shopped at vintage stores, and hardly ever wore much make up. The term earth girl, comes to mind when I think of her. And pixie, as well. People would often confuse her with being a teenager because she looked so damn young. Lily was tough as steel, both emotionally and physically. Once she fell off a 2nd story building at the University of Miami campus. She went to the hospital and walked out, took the brace off and kept going, because she had to be at work the next day.

When she was pregnant with her son (now 2 years old), she glowed. It was the most amazing time in her life. The loveliest I had ever seen her. Her skin looked a golden olive, and her almond shaped eyes, glistened. I could see life in her. And she was truly happy and hopeful, looking forward to the birth of her son.

I thought she would make it. She began taking prenatal yoga, went back to being a vegetarian, and was dedicated to meditating and praying a lot. We had no idea of what was to come. Almost 2 years later, and we’re still awaiting answers. Every day Lilly’s mother wakes up thinking about Lilly and what could have been. It must be so painful for her to raise her grandson, Lilly’s 2 year old son, while praying for the day when Lilly is found and finally put to rest.

We have reason to believe Lilly is a victim of homicide but many questions remain unanswered. And that is why we’re asking for your help.

We’re currently trying to piece together Lilly’s last movements. Anyone with information which could assist police with their investigations should immediately contact Miami Dade Police at 305-418-7200 or Crime Stoppers at (305)471-8477.

If you feel compelled to help find Lilly Aramburo, there are many ways you can help. Please do so by doing one or more of the following:
Friend on Myspace http://www.myspace.com/missinglillyaramburo
Join the Facebook Cause to Find Lilly Aramburo
Subscribe to the Justice in Miami RSS feed
Please Stumble, bookmark & share this post
If you’re in South Florida, print a flyer and post and share it as much you can.
If you’re a blogger, join the MyBlogLog Justice in Miami Community

Lily’s case has received very little media coverage. So far, the only article published about Lilly’s disappearance was in the Miami New Times last September. As you can see, Nancy Grace was kind enough to feature a Case Alert about Lilly, as well. Can you help us get media coverage for Lilly? Contact Nancy Grace and ask her to investigate Lilly’s possible homicide. We’d like Lilly to be featured on local media stations in Miami. Please let us know if you can help with this. Drop me a line or leave a comment on this post.

Lilly’s family and friends are grateful for your prayers and continued support. Let’s bring resolution to this grieving family.

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Tribute to Lilly Aramburo

There’s never a day where thoughts of Lilly are far away. Listened to some of her favorite songs by the Magnetic Fields today… Somehow makes me feel better when I’m down. I remember the times we sat in my car as I drove her home, listening to music. She loved music. I could see her sitting next to me, smiling. As a tribute to Lilly’s loving memory, here are a few of her favorite songs. The ones I listen to and reminisce…

The Magnetic Fields – All My Little Words

The Magnetic Fields – The One You Really Love

Sublime – Waiting For my Ruca

RIP Lilly Aramburo. Justice will be done. Words can’t describe how much we love you and miss you! xoxo

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FBI Offers 25K Reward for Info on Murder of 3 Year Old

I just came upon this article in the Miami Herald and wanted to share it with you. I can’t imagine the suffering this little girl’s family has had to endure. If anyone knows anything about the 1987 murder of 3-year-old Julie Magliulo in North Lauderdale, please do the right thing and contact the FBI at 1-800-225-5324.

clipped from www.miamiherald.com

Broward child’s 1987 murder to be reopened

The Broward Sheriff’s Office and the FBI plan Wednesday morning to announce the reopening of the late 1980s case of a 3-year-old girl found killed in West Broward.

On June 8, 1987, Julie Magliulo walked outside her family’s home near North Lauderdale. Her parents never saw her alive again.

Her skeleton was found about 10 months later, dumped about 20 miles away in what then was a barren swampland, and now is the city of Weston.

Her disappearance was selected as part of an initiative by the FBI’s Crimes Against Children Unit, which includes Child Abduction Rape Deployment Teams, FBI spokeswoman Judy Orihuela said Tuesday.

”This was one of the five that was picked from around the country,” Orihuela said.

The FBI has offered a reward of up to $25,000 for information that leads to an arrest and conviction. Those with information are asked to call 1-800-225-5324.

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The Birth of Justice Interrupted Crime Investigation Radio Network

I have some exciting news to share with you. Published Author and Victims Advocate, Susan Murphy Milano, Stacy Dittrich, a law enforcement officer and Robin Sax, a sex-crimes D.A – joined forces to create the Justice Interrupted Crime Investigation Network. The focus of their alliance is to provide justice to victims of unsolved murders, rape, abducted children, family violence, missing person cases, domestic violence, cold cases and crimes against children. All three women have worked tirelessly for victims. I trust they will bring much needed attention to many important cases that have been ignored by traditional media and remained unsolved.

Personally, I am relieved. As the Spokesperson, for a missing mother, I know from experience how frustrating it is to get media attention. I know what it’s like to spend endless hours making phone calls to the press, emailing newspapers, radio stations and news channels, contacting anyone having the ability to publish a story. All in vain. I’ve come to the sad conclusion that media (especially locally) suffer from Missing White Woman Syndrome. There is a clear bias. Media attention has everything to do with the right race, age, social class and gender. Otherwise, don’t expect them to cover your story. Notice that most women who get plastered all over the news are usually attractive, white, and middle to upper-class. Things would have turned out very differently if Lilly had white skin and came from a wealthy family. The Miami Herald doesn’t care about a Hispanic woman who lived in Kendall and went missing.

UPDATE 12/20/08 and WARNING
Since this post, I’ve learned that Susan Murphy-Milano is not to be trusted. For more info on my experience with Susan, please see my Sincerest Apology to Christen You see, I was lied to by Susan. She told me she had evidence (GPS and credit card records) which proved Christen Pacheco (Lilly’s fiance) was responsible for her murder. All lies…

*Please be very careful if you’re thinking of going to Justice Interrupted for help.*

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How To Make Civil Servants Work for You!


Never Give Up
Originally uploaded by GregPC

By David Van Norman – Civil Servant.

VAN NORMAN’S RULES FOR DEALING WITH CIVIL SERVANTS

Including, but not limited to, Coroners and Cops

“The Taxpayer Speech:

“Matthew was, and still may be, a taxpayer. His family are taxpayers. YOU are a taxpayer. They (or you, on their behalf) needn’t go begging, hat in hand, for information. He, they, and you, have already paid for that service! You support, by paying taxes and purchasing goods and services in the community (anywhere), the infrastructure of government, which includes law enforcement organizations. You paid for my training and experience (regardless of where you live) for me to learn what I know, and for the investigators in Whatever County to do what they do. You pay for the gas that propels their cars and the computers on which they type their reports. You, as a taxpayer, citizen, victim, loved-one of a victim, or private advocate acting on behalf of the family, have EVERY RIGHT to expect professionalism, and adherence to the rules of professional conduct. If you don’t get that, someone needs to loose their job!

“Law enforcement, like most organizations, has a political side. A deputy investigator, patrolman or detective will not be concerned with the political aspect of failing to do what needed to be done. They are insulated from above by layers of supervision. A sergeant is higher up the supervisory chain, but only a few have aspirations to rise into management. By the time a police officer is promoted to lieutenant, and certainly by captain or chief, politics is about all there is. The weakest link, believe it or not, is the department chief or Sheriff. A chief is generally an appointed position (serving at the pleasure of the county administration), while the sheriff or coroner is generally elected. Either way, scandal will end their careers (and does, on a daily basis) in a heartbeat. No matter how high-and-mighty I think I am, there is always someone higher, and mightier, than me, who understands that he (or she) is held in place by a fickle public.

“Law enforcement, by its very nature, can be intimidating to deal with. But, the fact is that law enforcement has more to fear from you than you from them. Provided you plan your contacts with them, and don’t expect the moon, you should be able to assist the family.

“I appreciate that it is difficult to communicate effectively with law enforcement or other forensic specialists. There are legitimate reasons that some information cannot be released to the public. No one knows who you are – you may be the murderer. But, if your salutation is professional, and includes a concise statement of who you are, and why you are calling – and if it sounds as though you make these calls on behalf of families 20 times a day, your credibility goes up.

“One of the reasons I use email so much, is that it gives the receiver a sense of solidity – having something in hand (or at least in a computer) that verifies the sender’s veracity. My signature block is chock full of junk, but anyone reading it knows they can check me out – I’m inviting them to! My emails are designed to overwhelm. I intentionally front-load everything. It presents in the minds eye a bulldozer that WILL NOT STOP. I want them to see me coming, take me seriously, and comply with my requests. I want them to know that if they don’t comply, I won’t be ignored. Not everybody gets that message… the first time. That’s another advantage of the email format, I just send the same message with SECOND REQUEST at the end of the subject line, with the original message attached (date-time stamped), and CC it to the receiver’s supervisor. That generally gets the job done.

“My standard advice is that during your legitimate inquiries, if anyone refuses to answer your questions, you should “walk up” the chain of command – at each level asking if it is the policy and practice of the subordinate to ignore inquiries from the grieving families of decedents.

“I recommend that you call the agency, and start your inquiry with an investigator – and hook him (or her). Then tell them that you have constructed an email with information about the missing person that you would like to send to him (or her) for ‘forwarding to the most appropriate authority within your department.'”

I’d like to thank Mr. David Van Norman for allowing me to publish his advice. It is my sincere wish that everyone who reads this post benefits from it, like I did.

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